Pittsburgh DUI Lawyer George Heym 

FORMER ALLEGHENY COUNTY DUI PROSECUTOR!

DUI Attorney George Heym
DUI Related Scientific Studies
The Law Offices of George Heym 564 Forbes Ave, Suite 810 Pittsburgh, PA 15219 412-521-2628
Blood alcohol concentration and psychomotor effects S. A. Grant1,3, K. Millar2 and G. N. C. Kenny1 This study assessed the effect of intravenous alcohol infusions on psychomotor impairment and compared it with that of alcohol administered orally. Comparisons were made between three European drink-driving limits of blood alcohol concentration (BAC) (20, 50 and 80 mg 100 ml–1) and an oral dose of alcohol 0.75 mg kg–1. Twelve volunteers, aged 22–34 yr, were recruited. At targets of 20, 50 and and 80 mg 100 ml–1, the mean (SD) BAC was 22.1 (3.7), 51.5 (3.3) and 80.5 (4.2) mg 100 ml–1, respectively. The peak BAC following an oral dose of alcohol 0.75 mg kg–1 ranged from 19 to 68 mg 100 ml–1. In psychomotor testing, choice reaction time deteriorated with increasing BAC and showed significant differences between baseline and the 50 (P<0.05) and 80 mg 100 ml–1 (P<0.01) conditions. Dual-task secondary reaction time deteriorated with increasing BAC and showed a statistically significant difference between all groups and baseline (oral and 20 mg groups, P<0.05; 50 and 80 mg groups, P<0.01). Dual-task tracking in the 50 and 80 mg groups was significantly different from baseline (P<0.05 and P<0.01, respectively). Oral dosing resulted in widely variable BACs, making it difficult to assess psychomotor impairment reliably. An intravenous infusion enables the BAC to be maintained within a narrow range. This allows precision when investigating the effects of alcohol on psychomotor performance. Age, sex, and blood alcohol concentration of killed and injured drivers, riders, and passengers. Holubowycz OT, Kloeden CN, McLean AJ. The relationships between type of road user, sex, age, and blood alcohol concentration (BAC) were examined among 1,389 adult vehicle occupants and motorcyclists fatally injured in crashes within South Australia from 1985 to 1992, inclusive, and among 1,573 adult vehicle occupants and motorcyclists admitted to a Level-1 trauma centre from August 1985 to July 1987. The relationships between BAC and both day of week of crash and the number of vehicles involved were determined among fatalities, whereas among admissions, duration of hospitalization and type of unit to which the casualty was admitted were also examined. BACs of .08 g/100 mL or higher were found in 38% of killed and 30% of injured drivers, 37% and 27% of passengers, and 35% and 22% of male motorcycle riders. Alcohol involvement was almost nonexistent among the elderly. The finding that the proportion of injured motorcyclists was similar to that of drivers is consistent with motorcyclists' increased risk of injury even in relatively minor crashes. Male motorcycle riders were found to be significantly younger than male drivers. They were also significantly less likely to have been drinking and, if they had been drinking, their mean BAC was significantly lower. The results are also consistent with the well-established observations that alcohol involvement is greater in single-vehicle crashes and in crashes occurring on weekends. Average duration of hospitalization was not found to differ between types of road user or between those with a BAC above and below .08 g/100 mL. How do prolonged wakefulness and alcohol compare in the decrements they produce on a simulated driving task? Arnedt JT, Wilde GJ, Munt PW, MacLean AW. The effects of alcohol ingestion were compared with those of prolonged wakefulness on a simulated driving task. Eighteen healthy, male subjects aged between 19 and 35 years drove for 30 min on a simulated driving task at blood alcohol concentrations of 0.00, 0.05 and 0.08%. Subjective sleepiness was assessed before and after the driving task. Driving performance was measured in terms of the mean and standard deviation (S.D.) of lane position (tracking); the mean and S.D. of speed deviation (the difference between the actual speed and the posted speed limit); and the number of off-road occurrences. Ratings of sleepiness increased with increasing blood alcohol concentration, and were higher following the driving task. With increasing blood alcohol concentration, tracking variability, speed variability, and off-road events increased, while speed deviation decreased, the result of subjects driving faster. The results were compared with a previous study examining simulated driving performance during one night of prolonged wakefulness [Arnedt, J.T., MacLean A.W., 1996. Effects of sleep loss on urban and motorway driving stimulation performance. Presented at the Drive Alert... Arrive Alive International Forum, Washington DC], using an approach adopted by Dawson and Reid [Dawson, D., Reid, K., 1997. Fatigue, alcohol and performance impairment. Nature 388, 23]. For mean tracking, tracking variability, and speed variability 18.5 and 21 h of wakefulness produced changes of the same magnitude as 0.05 and 0.08% blood alcohol concentration, respectively. Alcohol consumption produced changes in speed deviation and off-road occurrences of greater magnitude than the corresponding levels of prolonged wakefulness. While limited to situations in which there is no other traffic present, the findings suggest that impairments in simulated driving are evident even at relatively modest blood alcohol levels, and that wakefulness prolonged by as little as 3 h can produce decrements in the ability to maintain speed and road position as serious as those found at the legal limits of alcohol consumption. Absorption, distribution and elimination of alcohol: highway safety aspects. Dubowski KM. Key aspects of the pharmacokinetics of alcohol are highly relevant to highway safety. Of particular pertinence are the partition of alcohol between various body tissues and fluids and the resulting alcohol concentration ratios for blood: breath and other body fluids, as well as the irregularity and short-term fluctuations of the blood and breath alcohol curves. Most alcohol pharmacokinetics parameters are subject to wide intersubject variability, as exemplified by peak blood alcohol concentrations reached on ingestion of identical weight- adjusted doses, time to peak after end of drinking and the rate of alcohol elimination from the blood. This great biological intersubject variability, when combined with sex-, age- and time-related differences, makes the blood alcohol information in widely distributed alcohol consumption nomograms and tables based on mean data inappropriate as a guide for the drinking behavior of individuals. Although there is good statistical correlation between the alcohol concentration of different body tissues and fluids in the fully postabsorptive state, wide individual variations from the population mean alcohol partition values exist. It is often impossible to determine whether the postabsorptive state has been reached at any given time. Those factors make it impossible or infeasible to convert the alcohol concentration of breath or urine to the simultaneous blood alcohol concentration with forensically acceptable certainty, especially under per se or absolute alcohol concentration laws. Inclusion of breath alcohol concentrations in drinking-driving statutes, as definitions or per se offense elements, makes unnecessary the conversion of breath alcohol analysis results into equivalent blood alcohol concentrations. Urine alcohol concentrations are inadequately correlated with blood alcohol concentrations or with driver impairment, and analysis of bladder urine is, therefore, inappropriate in traffic law enforcement. Significantly large sex-related differences in pharmacokinetic parameters have been demonstrated (e.g., in peak blood alcohol concentrations for weight-adjusted doses). The effects of age and time of day have been less extensively studies and are less clear. Breath and blood alcohol time curves are subject to short-term fluctuations from the trend line and other irregularities, and often do not follow the typical Widmark pattern. From the existing information on pharmacokinetics of alcohol and the characteristics and variability of blood and breath alcohol versus time curves, the following conclusions can be reached. Predicting DUI recidivism: blood alcohol concentration and driver record factors. Marowitz LA. This study examined the relationship between blood alcohol concentration (BAC) at arrest, driving history and other demographic factors, and the 1-year post-arrest probability of recidivism for drunk driving (DUI) convictees. Complex and simple prediction models were developed. All models found a statistically significant cubic relationship between BAC and recidivism, reflecting a relatively high rate of recidivism at a BAC of 0.00%, decreasing to a minimum at ca 0.09% BAC, then increasing to another relatively high rate at a BAC of ca 0.29%, followed by a decline in recidivism to BAC levels of 0.35% and beyond. High rates of recidivism at high BACs suggest alcohol dependency, while high rates at low BACs suggest the involvement of other impairing substances. The rate of DUI recidivism for offenders who refused alcohol testing was the same as for aggregated BAC-tested offenders who had prior DUIs at the time of the arrest. The probability of DUI recidivism predicted by a simple model using BAC, prior 2-year traffic convictions, and offender level (first or repeat offender) could be used along with other factors by presentence investigators, judges or in administrative settings to determine appropriate sanctions, treatment or other remedial measures. The findings support the notion that first offenders with high BAC levels and prior 2-year traffic convictions are at as high a risk of recidivating as many repeat offenders, and might therefore benefit from similar sanctions and/or remedial treatment. The findings also support viewing DUI arrestees with very low BACs as probable drug users with relatively high probabilities of recidivating. Effect of Concentration of Ingested Ethanol on Blood Alcohol Levels Risto P. Roine, Thomas Gentry, Robert T. Lim Jr, Enrique Baraona, Charles S. Lieber, The effect of the concentration of ingested ethanol on the resulting blood alcohol concentrations (BAC) was tested in both humans and rats. In humans, when 0.3 g/kg body weight ethanol was ingested postprandially, the mean area under the blood alcohol curve (AUC) and the mean peak BAC were significantly lower with a concentrated (40% w/v) than with a dilute (4%) solution. Similarly, rats in the fed state exhibited decreasing mean AUCs with increasing concentrations (4%, 16%, and 40%) of intragastrically administered ethanol (1.0 g/kg). Pharmacokinetic analysis comparing intragastric and intraperitoneal administration of ethanol to rats indicated that the more concentrated solution resulted in less alcohol reaching the systemic circulation (4%: 0.896 ± 0.071 g/kg; 16%: 0.772 ± 0.072 g/kg; 40%: 0.453 ± 0.037 g/kg) and suggested that this effect could be attributed to two factors: increased gastric retention of ethanol (4%: 0.109 ± 0.024 g/kg; 16%: 0.102 2 0.016 g/kg; 40%: 0.214 ± 0.042 g/kg) and a large increase in first-pass metabolism (4%: 0.004 ± 0.054 g/kg; 16%: 0.145 ± 0.048 g/kg; 40%: 0.329 ± 0.044 g/kg). In contrast to the results in the fed state, in humans fasted overnight the concentration of alcohol consumed (4%, 16%, and 40%) had no significant effect on mean AUCs. In fasted rats, mean AUCs after intragastric intubation of the two lower concentrations of ethanol (4% and 16%) were comparable to those found after intraperitoneal injection, and only the highest ethanol concentration (40%) produced a lower mean AUC. Our results demonstrate that the consumption of a concentrated solution of ethanol results in lower blood alcohol levels than does a dilute solution, when subjects are tested in the fed state. This effect is associated with more first pass metabolism and less bioavailability with the high ethanol concentrations. These findings now raise the issue whether ethanol in low concentration beverages such as beer and wine has a greater bioavailability than in distilled spirits. The Risk of Dying in Alcohol-Related Automobile Crashes among Habitual Drunk Drivers Robert D. Brewer, Peter D. Morris, Thomas B. Cole, Stephanie Watkins, Michael J. Patetta, and Carol Popkin Background Reports suggest that people who drive while intoxicated by alcohol may do so repeatedly. We hypothesized that persons arrested for driving while impaired might be at increased risk for death in an alcohol-related motor vehicle crash. To evaluate this possibility, we studied the deaths of drivers in alcohol-related motor vehicle accidents in North Carolina over a 10-year period. Methods We compared drivers who died in motor vehicle crashes from 1980 through 1989 and who had blood alcohol concentrations of at least 20 mg per deciliter (4.3 mmol per liter), referred to as the case drivers, with those who died in crashes but had blood alcohol concentrations below 20 mg per deciliter, referred to as the control drivers. We identified case drivers and control drivers through the state Medical Examiner System. We then searched North Carolina driver-history files for the five years before each death to identify arrests for driving while impaired. Results We linked a total of 1646 case drivers and 1474 control drivers to their driver-history files. Case drivers were more likely than control drivers to have been arrested for driving while impaired (26 percent vs. 3 percent). After we controlled for potential confounding variables, case drivers 21 to 34 years of age were 4.3 times more likely (95 percent confidence interval, 2.7 to 6.8) than control drivers to have been arrested for driving while impaired; case drivers 35 years of age or older were 11.7 times more likely (95 percent confidence interval, 6.8 to 20.1). The strength of the association appeared to increase with the number of prior arrests. Case drivers were also more likely than the general population of currently licensed drivers to have been arrested. Conclusions Arrests for driving while impaired substantially increase the risk of eventual death in an alcohol-related crash. Aggressive intervention in the cases of people arrested for driving while impaired may decrease the likelihood of a future fatal alcohol-related crash.
Call or Text me on my Cell Phone 24/7 at 412-216-4984
Pittsburgh DUI Lawyer George Heym accepts all credit cards
Free DUI Consultation
DUI Related Scientific Studies
The Law Offices of George Heym 564 Forbes Ave, Suite 810 Pittsburgh, PA 15219 412-521-2628
Blood alcohol concentration and psychomotor effects S. A. Grant1,3, K. Millar2 and G. N. C. Kenny1 This study assessed the effect of intravenous alcohol infusions on psychomotor impairment and compared it with that of alcohol administered orally. Comparisons were made between three European drink-driving limits of blood alcohol concentration (BAC) (20, 50 and 80 mg 100 ml–1) and an oral dose of alcohol 0.75 mg kg–1. Twelve volunteers, aged 22–34 yr, were recruited. At targets of 20, 50 and and 80 mg 100 ml–1, the mean (SD) BAC was 22.1 (3.7), 51.5 (3.3) and 80.5 (4.2) mg 100 ml–1, respectively. The peak BAC following an oral dose of alcohol 0.75 mg kg–1 ranged from 19 to 68 mg 100 ml–1. In psychomotor testing, choice reaction time deteriorated with increasing BAC and showed significant differences between baseline and the 50 (P<0.05) and 80 mg 100 ml–1 (P<0.01) conditions. Dual-task secondary reaction time deteriorated with increasing BAC and showed a statistically significant difference between all groups and baseline (oral and 20 mg groups, P<0.05; 50 and 80 mg groups, P<0.01). Dual-task tracking in the 50 and 80 mg groups was significantly different from baseline (P<0.05 and P<0.01, respectively). Oral dosing resulted in widely variable BACs, making it difficult to assess psychomotor impairment reliably. An intravenous infusion enables the BAC to be maintained within a narrow range. This allows precision when investigating the effects of alcohol on psychomotor performance. Age, sex, and blood alcohol concentration of killed and injured drivers, riders, and passengers. Holubowycz OT, Kloeden CN, McLean AJ. The relationships between type of road user, sex, age, and blood alcohol concentration (BAC) were examined among 1,389 adult vehicle occupants and motorcyclists fatally injured in crashes within South Australia from 1985 to 1992, inclusive, and among 1,573 adult vehicle occupants and motorcyclists admitted to a Level-1 trauma centre from August 1985 to July 1987. The relationships between BAC and both day of week of crash and the number of vehicles involved were determined among fatalities, whereas among admissions, duration of hospitalization and type of unit to which the casualty was admitted were also examined. BACs of .08 g/100 mL or higher were found in 38% of killed and 30% of injured drivers, 37% and 27% of passengers, and 35% and 22% of male motorcycle riders. Alcohol involvement was almost nonexistent among the elderly. The finding that the proportion of injured motorcyclists was similar to that of drivers is consistent with motorcyclists' increased risk of injury even in relatively minor crashes. Male motorcycle riders were found to be significantly younger than male drivers. They were also significantly less likely to have been drinking and, if they had been drinking, their mean BAC was significantly lower. The results are also consistent with the well-established observations that alcohol involvement is greater in single-vehicle crashes and in crashes occurring on weekends. Average duration of hospitalization was not found to differ between types of road user or between those with a BAC above and below .08 g/100 mL. How do prolonged wakefulness and alcohol compare in the decrements they produce on a simulated driving task? Arnedt JT, Wilde GJ, Munt PW, MacLean AW. The effects of alcohol ingestion were compared with those of prolonged wakefulness on a simulated driving task. Eighteen healthy, male subjects aged between 19 and 35 years drove for 30 min on a simulated driving task at blood alcohol concentrations of 0.00, 0.05 and 0.08%. Subjective sleepiness was assessed before and after the driving task. Driving performance was measured in terms of the mean and standard deviation (S.D.) of lane position (tracking); the mean and S.D. of speed deviation (the difference between the actual speed and the posted speed limit); and the number of off-road occurrences. Ratings of sleepiness increased with increasing blood alcohol concentration, and were higher following the driving task. With increasing blood alcohol concentration, tracking variability, speed variability, and off-road events increased, while speed deviation decreased, the result of subjects driving faster. The results were compared with a previous study examining simulated driving performance during one night of prolonged wakefulness [Arnedt, J.T., MacLean A.W., 1996. Effects of sleep loss on urban and motorway driving stimulation performance. Presented at the Drive Alert... Arrive Alive International Forum, Washington DC], using an approach adopted by Dawson and Reid [Dawson, D., Reid, K., 1997. Fatigue, alcohol and performance impairment. Nature 388, 23]. For mean tracking, tracking variability, and speed variability 18.5 and 21 h of wakefulness produced changes of the same magnitude as 0.05 and 0.08% blood alcohol concentration, respectively. Alcohol consumption produced changes in speed deviation and off-road occurrences of greater magnitude than the corresponding levels of prolonged wakefulness. While limited to situations in which there is no other traffic present, the findings suggest that impairments in simulated driving are evident even at relatively modest blood alcohol levels, and that wakefulness prolonged by as little as 3 h can produce decrements in the ability to maintain speed and road position as serious as those found at the legal limits of alcohol consumption. Absorption, distribution and elimination of alcohol: highway safety aspects. Dubowski KM. Key aspects of the pharmacokinetics of alcohol are highly relevant to highway safety. Of particular pertinence are the partition of alcohol between various body tissues and fluids and the resulting alcohol concentration ratios for blood: breath and other body fluids, as well as the irregularity and short-term fluctuations of the blood and breath alcohol curves. Most alcohol pharmacokinetics parameters are subject to wide intersubject variability, as exemplified by peak blood alcohol concentrations reached on ingestion of identical weight- adjusted doses, time to peak after end of drinking and the rate of alcohol elimination from the blood. This great biological intersubject variability, when combined with sex-, age- and time-related differences, makes the blood alcohol information in widely distributed alcohol consumption nomograms and tables based on mean data inappropriate as a guide for the drinking behavior of individuals. Although there is good statistical correlation between the alcohol concentration of different body tissues and fluids in the fully postabsorptive state, wide individual variations from the population mean alcohol partition values exist. It is often impossible to determine whether the postabsorptive state has been reached at any given time. Those factors make it impossible or infeasible to convert the alcohol concentration of breath or urine to the simultaneous blood alcohol concentration with forensically acceptable certainty, especially under per se or absolute alcohol concentration laws. Inclusion of breath alcohol concentrations in drinking-driving statutes, as definitions or per se offense elements, makes unnecessary the conversion of breath alcohol analysis results into equivalent blood alcohol concentrations. Urine alcohol concentrations are inadequately correlated with blood alcohol concentrations or with driver impairment, and analysis of bladder urine is, therefore, inappropriate in traffic law enforcement. Significantly large sex- related differences in pharmacokinetic parameters have been demonstrated (e.g., in peak blood alcohol concentrations for weight-adjusted doses). The effects of age and time of day have been less extensively studies and are less clear. Breath and blood alcohol time curves are subject to short-term fluctuations from the trend line and other irregularities, and often do not follow the typical Widmark pattern. From the existing information on pharmacokinetics of alcohol and the characteristics and variability of blood and breath alcohol versus time curves, the following conclusions can be reached. Predicting DUI recidivism: blood alcohol concentration and driver record factors. Marowitz LA. This study examined the relationship between blood alcohol concentration (BAC) at arrest, driving history and other demographic factors, and the 1-year post-arrest probability of recidivism for drunk driving (DUI) convictees. Complex and simple prediction models were developed. All models found a statistically significant cubic relationship between BAC and recidivism, reflecting a relatively high rate of recidivism at a BAC of 0.00%, decreasing to a minimum at ca 0.09% BAC, then increasing to another relatively high rate at a BAC of ca 0.29%, followed by a decline in recidivism to BAC levels of 0.35% and beyond. High rates of recidivism at high BACs suggest alcohol dependency, while high rates at low BACs suggest the involvement of other impairing substances. The rate of DUI recidivism for offenders who refused alcohol testing was the same as for aggregated BAC-tested offenders who had prior DUIs at the time of the arrest. The probability of DUI recidivism predicted by a simple model using BAC, prior 2-year traffic convictions, and offender level (first or repeat offender) could be used along with other factors by presentence investigators, judges or in administrative settings to determine appropriate sanctions, treatment or other remedial measures. The findings support the notion that first offenders with high BAC levels and prior 2-year traffic convictions are at as high a risk of recidivating as many repeat offenders, and might therefore benefit from similar sanctions and/or remedial treatment. The findings also support viewing DUI arrestees with very low BACs as probable drug users with relatively high probabilities of recidivating. Effect of Concentration of Ingested Ethanol on Blood Alcohol Levels Risto P. Roine, Thomas Gentry, Robert T. Lim Jr, Enrique Baraona, Charles S. Lieber, The effect of the concentration of ingested ethanol on the resulting blood alcohol concentrations (BAC) was tested in both humans and rats. In humans, when 0.3 g/kg body weight ethanol was ingested postprandially, the mean area under the blood alcohol curve (AUC) and the mean peak BAC were significantly lower with a concentrated (40% w/v) than with a dilute (4%) solution. Similarly, rats in the fed state exhibited decreasing mean AUCs with increasing concentrations (4%, 16%, and 40%) of intragastrically administered ethanol (1.0 g/kg). Pharmacokinetic analysis comparing intragastric and intraperitoneal administration of ethanol to rats indicated that the more concentrated solution resulted in less alcohol reaching the systemic circulation (4%: 0.896 ± 0.071 g/kg; 16%: 0.772 ± 0.072 g/kg; 40%: 0.453 ± 0.037 g/kg) and suggested that this effect could be attributed to two factors: increased gastric retention of ethanol (4%: 0.109 ± 0.024 g/kg; 16%: 0.102 2 0.016 g/kg; 40%: 0.214 ± 0.042 g/kg) and a large increase in first-pass metabolism (4%: 0.004 ± 0.054 g/kg; 16%: 0.145 ± 0.048 g/kg; 40%: 0.329 ± 0.044 g/kg). In contrast to the results in the fed state, in humans fasted overnight the concentration of alcohol consumed (4%, 16%, and 40%) had no significant effect on mean AUCs. In fasted rats, mean AUCs after intragastric intubation of the two lower concentrations of ethanol (4% and 16%) were comparable to those found after intraperitoneal injection, and only the highest ethanol concentration (40%) produced a lower mean AUC. Our results demonstrate that the consumption of a concentrated solution of ethanol results in lower blood alcohol levels than does a dilute solution, when subjects are tested in the fed state. This effect is associated with more first pass metabolism and less bioavailability with the high ethanol concentrations. These findings now raise the issue whether ethanol in low concentration beverages such as beer and wine has a greater bioavailability than in distilled spirits. The Risk of Dying in Alcohol-Related Automobile Crashes among Habitual Drunk Drivers Robert D. Brewer, Peter D. Morris, Thomas B. Cole, Stephanie Watkins, Michael J. Patetta, and Carol Popkin Background Reports suggest that people who drive while intoxicated by alcohol may do so repeatedly. We hypothesized that persons arrested for driving while impaired might be at increased risk for death in an alcohol-related motor vehicle crash. To evaluate this possibility, we studied the deaths of drivers in alcohol-related motor vehicle accidents in North Carolina over a 10-year period. Methods We compared drivers who died in motor vehicle crashes from 1980 through 1989 and who had blood alcohol concentrations of at least 20 mg per deciliter (4.3 mmol per liter), referred to as the case drivers, with those who died in crashes but had blood alcohol concentrations below 20 mg per deciliter, referred to as the control drivers. We identified case drivers and control drivers through the state Medical Examiner System. We then searched North Carolina driver-history files for the five years before each death to identify arrests for driving while impaired. Results We linked a total of 1646 case drivers and 1474 control drivers to their driver-history files. Case drivers were more likely than control drivers to have been arrested for driving while impaired (26 percent vs. 3 percent). After we controlled for potential confounding variables, case drivers 21 to 34 years of age were 4.3 times more likely (95 percent confidence interval, 2.7 to 6.8) than control drivers to have been arrested for driving while impaired; case drivers 35 years of age or older were 11.7 times more likely (95 percent confidence interval, 6.8 to 20.1). The strength of the association appeared to increase with the number of prior arrests. Case drivers were also more likely than the general population of currently licensed drivers to have been arrested. Conclusions Arrests for driving while impaired substantially increase the risk of eventual death in an alcohol- related crash. Aggressive intervention in the cases of people arrested for driving while impaired may decrease the likelihood of a future fatal alcohol-related crash.
For a Free DUI Consultation Call or Text me on my Cell Phone 24/7  412-216-4984
Pittsburgh DUI Lawyer George Heym accepts all credit cards
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Pittsburgh DUI Lawyer George Heym 

Former DUI Prosecutor!

Exclusively Defending DUI Cases!